Tuesday, February 4, 2014

1961 Pininfarina Jacqueline Sedan. The Jack?

The Jacqueline was a gorgeous coupe designed by Pininfarina in 1961. It was a Cadillac underneath and may have been an attempt to sell Cadillac on another production car, as their two-year contract to build Brougham sedans ended in with the 1960 models.

At first I tried to keep the coupe's skeletal thin C-pillar but it didn't work on the sedan. When I added this wide body-color panel, still inset in the chrome trim, the sedan really popped for me!

I think this sedan comes off as a sportier Mercedes 280SE or perhaps Maserati Quattroporte from that period. I really love the way it came out!
  • The Jacqueline article by Hemmings Motor News, here.

6 comments:

  1. Beautiful! You've done Pinin and Jacquie proud. This body with reliable American mecanicals would ahve been more popular than the Broughams, I think. Perfection!

    Paul, NYC

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    1. thanks! Sometimes when I make changes to a car they seem to work so well I wonder if they actually went through that stage once. This sedan really does work as well as the coupe, almost to the point I think they must have considered one and then nixed it last moment.

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  2. Many times when I see your work I wish I could see the other end (front or rear), but the front of the coupe ( thanks for the link) just doesn't cut it. I think this looks better as a sedan - I cannot believe I just thought that, I love coupes. This makes a handsome sedan but it does not look like a Cadillac. Great fun though.

    Bobf

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    1. Hi Bob!
      agreed about the front! I'm working on a revision of the grille/headlights to see if I can make it a bit more Cadillac and less Peugeot/Pininfarina style of the time. Stay tuned, lol.

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  3. The subtle rise of the rear flanks suggest fins, brilliant. I also love the (from contemporary standards) over the top chrome. If Cadillac had gone in this direction rather than embarked on it's Skeg adventure in the early 60's, who knows what the "Cadillac" look may have evolved into by the late 60's. I love your work. Thank You.

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